Creative Subjects Curriculum

At Parkland Primary School, the Creative Curriculum encompasses three subjects: Art and Design, Design and Technology, and Music. All pupils are taught a minimum of two blocks of learning from the creative subjects per term; over the course of the year this means that on average two blocks from each area within the Creative Curriculum have been taught. 

Intent - Music

A high-quality Music curriculum should engage, inspire, and motivate pupils to develop a love of music, and their talents as composers and musicians. It is a vehicle for personal expression, increasing self-confidence, creativity, and sense of achievement, and thus plays a significant role in the personal development of pupils. As pupils progress, they should develop the skills and knowledge needed to compose, perform, and appreciate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions. Thinking critically will allow them to review and evaluate their developing and growing musical knowledge and skill set. By using the Model Music Curriculum (MMC) to inform subject knowledge and planning, pupils are exposed to a vast repertoire, from classical to popular music, from all around the world.  

Aims of the Music Knowledge-led Curriculum:

  • Perform, listen to, review, and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles, and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians

 

  • Learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument, use technology appropriately and progress to the next level of musical excellence
  • Understand and explore how music is created, produced, and communicated, including through the inter-related dimensions: pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure, and appropriate musical notations.

Implementation

Teachers work collaboratively to plan Music using the learning journey planning format. Music is planned using progression maps and knowledge mapping to ensure teaching is designed to help learners to remember, in the long term, the content they have been taught and to integrate new knowledge into larger concepts. Each year group will use previous learning to inform the future, looking back on pieces of music covered in the past.  

For the wider curriculum, we block learning and re-visit practice over time through a spaced practise approach (Learning Scientists, 2016) as research suggests this will lead to better long-term retention of knowledge.  

As well as specifically planned music lessons throughout the year, children may appreciate music during weekly music assemblies. These assemblies are planned to expose children to a diverse range of music, whilst also allowing them to sing and experience music they already enjoy. Music assemblies explore genres of music that children might not have heard before. The assemblies explore the history of pieces of music as well as encouraging children to have diverse experiences, as mentioned in the MMC. There are opportunities for children to voice their opinions on new pieces of music and talk about them.  

By taking part in music lessons and learning journeys within the classroom in addition to music assemblies, children are able to have multiple opportunities to listen to and appreciate music.  

EYFS:

The EYFS Framework focuses the learning and development of children in the foundation years through seven areas of learning. The knowledge and skills taught in EYFS feed into the Music curriculum but are not taught as subject specific. The most relevant early years outcomes for Music are taken from the area of learning entitled, ‘Expressive Arts and Design’.  

Expressive Arts and Design: Exploring and Using Media and Materials – Early Learning Goal: 

Children sing songs, make music and dance, and experiment with ways of changing them.  

Expressive Arts and Design: Being Imaginative – Early Learning Goal: Children use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways, thinking about uses and purposes. They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role play and stories. 

The knowledge and skills needed to achieve these outcomes are taught mostly through children playing and exploring during continuous provision times in the day. Teachers deliberately plan enhanced activities which give opportunity for children to learn through their own discovery and independent perseverance. Areas in the EYFS environment, such as the outdoor Music Area, offer children daily opportunity for this. Music teaching is also implemented through weekly 30-minute Singing and Music lessons. The children learn new songs and experiment with rhythm and creating and changing sounds. 

In EYFS, teachers plan for opportunities for children to learn their own voice and body movements. Children can also take the time to listen attentively to music, exploring how it might make them feel and why.  

KS1 / KS2:

Within Music, blocks of learning allow the pupils the opportunity to firstly listen to and appraise a range of music from different historical periods, genres, styles, and traditions. Through planned musical activities, they will learn to sing, play instruments, improvise, and compose their own music. Pupils will then perform in different contexts, sharing their newly developed skills.  

Key Stage 1

Pupils should be taught to: 

  • use their voice expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes
  • play tuned and untuned instruments musically
  • listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music
  • experiment with, create, select, and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.

Key Stage 2

Pupils should be taught to: 

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control, and expression
  • improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music
  • listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory
  • use and understand staff and other musical notations
  • appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians
  • develop an understanding of the history of music.
  • begin to use technology to explore composition of music. 

Charanga Online Hub

Teachers use Charanga to teach music that is relevant to pupil’s learning. The Charanga hub contains a variety of modules and opportunities for teachers to teach music at a good level.  Children can play instruments in music lessons with the opportunity to compose and perform in Key Stage 2.  

Intent - Art and Design

A high-quality Art and Design curriculum should engage, inspire and challenge pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As pupils progress, they should be able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design. They should also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation. 

Aims of the Art and Design Curriculum:

  • Produce creative work, exploring ideas and recording experiences

 

  • Become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • Evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • Know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural Development of art forms

Implementation

Teachers work collaboratively to plan Art and Design using the learning journey planning format (Appendix 2). Art and Design is planned using progression maps to ensure teaching is designed to help learners to remember, in the long term, the content they have been taught and to integrate new knowledge into larger concepts.  
For the wider curriculum, we block learning and re-visit practice over time through a spaced practise approach (Learning Scientists, 2016) as research suggests this will lead to better long-term retention of knowledge.  

Impact

Assessing Progress
Formative Assessment: 
Pupils’ progress will be assessed using regular formative assessment in lessons through strategies such as questioning, regular retrieval practice, quizzing, independent learning tasks and assessment of work in sketch books and feedback.
Each learning journey block will be assessed formatively through the use of a knowledge-based quiz and/or a high-quality independent piece of art. Teachers will use this assessment to provide further feedback or re-teach concepts where necessary to close gaps and ensure pupils have mastered the curriculum content at that point. 
 
Assessing long-term learning: 
Skills will be sequentially re-visited and built upon due to the coherently planned and sequenced progression mapping across the school.  

Intent - Design and Technology

A high-quality Design and Technology curriculum should be practical in nature, using creativity and imagination to inspire pupils to design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within the context of their own lives and the world. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world will be developed.  Alongside this, pupils will consider their own and others’ needs, wants and values in relation to product design and manufacturing. Learning how to take risks will allow them to become resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Pupils will continually acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and make links to other disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art.  

Aims of the Art and Design Curriculum:

  • Develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world
  • Build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users
  • Critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others

 

  • Understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook.

 

Implementation

Teachers work collaboratively to plan Design and Technology using the learning journey planning format. Design and Technology is planned using progression maps to ensure teaching is designed to help learners to remember, in the long term, the content they have been taught and to integrate new knowledge into larger concepts.  
For the wider curriculum we block learning and re-visit practice over time through a spaced practise approach (Learning Scientists, 2016) as research suggests this will lead to better long-term retention of knowledge.  

EYFS:

The EYFS Framework focuses the learning and development of children in the foundation years through seven areas of learning. The knowledge and skills taught in EYFS feed into the Design and Technology curriculum but are not taught as subject specific. The most relevant early years outcomes for Design and Technology are taken from the area of learning entitled, ‘Expressive Arts and Design’.  

Expressive Arts and Design: Exploring and Using Media and Materials – Early Learning Goal: Children safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function. 

Expressive Arts and Design: Being Imaginative – Early Learning Goal: Children use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways, thinking about uses and purposes. They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design and technology, art, music, dance, role play and stories. 

Physical development: Moving and handling – Early Learning Goal: Children handle equipment and hold effectively, including pencils for writing. 

The knowledge and skills needed to achieve these outcomes are taught mostly through children playing and exploring during continuous provision times in the day. Teachers deliberately plan enhanced activities which give opportunity for children to learn through their own discovery and independent perseverance. Areas in the EYFS environment such as the indoor and outdoor Construction Zone, Investigation Station and Creative Area offer children daily opportunity for this. Some elements of Design and Technology are taught through teacher-led lessons and activities which link to half-termly topics.  

KS1 / KS2:

At Parkland Primary School, the Creative Curriculum encompasses three subjects: Art and Design, Design and Technology, and Music. Each term, all pupils are taught a minimum of one block of learning from the creative subjects. 
Within Design and Technology, over the course of an academic year, each key stage (KS1, LKS2, UKS2) will explore and revisit the four strands of designing and making: design, make, evaluate, and technical knowledge. These strands are taught through a variety of creative and practical activities whilst considering a range of relevant contexts (for example, the home and school, gardens and playgrounds, the local community, industry and the wider world). Each year group will study carefully chosen skills to ensure a continued interest in the subject as well as support pupils in acquiring new knowledge to further support the cultural capital of our pupils in line with our curriculum drivers.  
All blocks of Design Technology are recorded in Learning Journey books. Design Technology is taught once every term in KS1 and KS2. 

Impact

Assessing Progress
Formative Assessment: 
Pupils’ progress will be assessed using regular formative assessment in lessons through strategies such as questioning, regular retrieval practice, quizzing, independent learning tasks and assessment of work in books and feedback.  
Each learning journey block will be assessed formatively through the use of a knowledge-based quiz and/or a high-quality independent skills application outcome. Teachers will use this assessment to provide further feedback or re-teach concepts where necessary to close gaps and ensure pupils have mastered the curriculum content at that point. 

Assessing long-term learning: 
Skills will be sequentially re-visited and built upon due to the coherently planned and sequenced progression mapping across the school.